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Pascal Nicolay   Dr.  Research or Laboratory Scientist 
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Pascal Nicolay published an article in October 2018.
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0 temperature sensor
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Christian Gruber

2 shared publications

Carinthian Tech Research (CTR AG), Europastrasse 12, 9524 Villach, Austria

Emilie Courjon

1 shared publications

Frec|n|sys, Temis Innovation, 18 rue Alain Savary, 25000 Besançon, France

Gudrun Bruckner

1 shared publications

Carinthian Tech Research (CTR AG), Europastrasse 12, 9524 Villach, Austria

Hugo Chambon

1 shared publications

Carinthian Tech Research (CTR AG), Europastrasse 12, 9524 Villach, Austria

Martin Lenzhofer

1 shared publications

3
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Publications
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations A LN/Si-Based SAW Pressure Sensor Pascal Nicolay, Hugo Chambon, Gudrun Bruckner, Christian Gru... Published: 16 October 2018
Sensors, doi: 10.3390/s18103482
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors are small, passive and wireless devices. We present here the latest results obtained in a project aimed at developing a SAW-based implantable pressure sensor, equipped with a well-defined, 30 μm-thick, 4.7 mm-in-diameter, Lithium Niobate (LN) membrane. A novel fabrication process was used to solve the issue of accurate membrane etching in LN. LN/Si wafers were fabricated first, using wafer-bonding techniques. Grinding/polishing operations followed, to reduce the LN thickness to 30 μm. 2.45 GHz SAW Reflective Delay-Lines (R-DL) were then deposited on LN, using a combination of e-beam and optical lithography. The R-DL was designed in such a way as to allow for easy temperature compensation. Eventually, the membranes were etched in Si. A dedicated set-up was implemented, to characterize the sensors versus pressure and temperature. The achieved pressure accuracy is satisfactory (±0.56 mbar). However, discontinuities in the response curve and residual temperature sensitivity were observed. Further experiments, modeling and simulations were used to analyze the observed phenomena. They were shown to arise essentially from the presence of growing thermo-mechanical strain and stress fields, generated in the bimorph-like LN/Si structure, when the temperature changes. In particular, buckling effects explain the discontinuities, observed around 43 °C, in the response curves. Possible solutions are suggested and discussed.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation A Wireless and Passive Low-Pressure Sensor Pascal Nicolay, Martin Lenzhofer Published: 17 February 2014
Sensors, doi: 10.3390/s140203065
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
This paper will discuss the results obtained with a first prototype of a completely passive and wireless low pressure sensor. The device is a heat conductivity gauge, based on a wireless and passive SAW temperature sensor. The required heating energy is applied to the sensor using inductive coupling. The prototype was successfully tested in a vacuum chamber. Its equilibrium temperature changed drastically and in a reproducible way when pressure steps were applied. However, the response time was very long. A model is provided to account for the sensor’s behavior. It is then used to show that the response time could be strongly improved using basic design improvements. Further possible improvements are discussed.
Conference papers
CONFERENCE-ARTICLE 22 Reads 0 Citations <strong>Wireless and passive SAW devices, for Structural Health Monitoring applications.</strong> PASCAL NICOLAY Published: 14 November 2018
doi: 10.3390/ecsa-5-05734
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract

Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) passive and wireless sensors are a promising solution for condition and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. They are robust devices, which can withstand extreme operating conditions (very high temperatures, high pressure etc.). They do not require any embedded electronics and can be implanted in various kinds of (dielectric) structures. Moreover, SAW Sensors of the Reflective Delay Line (R-DL) type have built-in RFID capabilities, which can prove extremely useful for various industrial applications.

Our presentation will start with an overview of CTR R&D activities.

We will then present a short review of SAW RFID Sensors for industrial applications, with a focus on implantable devices like torque sensors, pressure sensors, and temperature sensors. Specific examples of applications in the chemical, automotive and steel industries will be provided.

We will then discuss the potential of SAW RFID Sensors for SHM applications. Existing solutions will be described, as well as possible applications based on existing 2.45GHz R-DL devices. As SAW sensors often fail in operation, due especially to housing failure at high temperature, promising ‘package-less’ solutions will be presented. Here, guided modes that propagate in protective multilayer structures are used, instead of surface waves. Several multilayer configurations have been suggested, simulated and/or tested in the past years. Pros & cons of the different configurations will be discussed.

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